Tech

Epic Games vs. Apple Judgment Allows App Store Developers to Link to Alternative Payment Methods

A decision was reached today in the high-profile Epic Games v. Apple trial, with U.S. District Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers ruling that Apple’s anti-steering conduct is anti-competitive, and ruling in favor of Apple on all other counts.

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Judge Rogers issued a permanent injunction that requires Apple to let developers direct customers to payment options other than Apple’s in-app purchase system.

From the permanent injunction:

Apple Inc. and its officers, agents, servants, employees, and any person in active concert or participation with them (“Apple”), are hereby permanently restrained and enjoined from prohibiting developers from (i) including in their apps and their metadata buttons, external links, or other calls to action that direct customers to purchasing mechanisms, in addition to In-App Purchasing and (ii) communicating with customers through points of contact obtained voluntarily from customers through account registration within the app.

Apple already announced last week that, starting in early 2022, it would allow developers of “reader” apps like Netflix, Spotify, and the Amazon Kindle app to include an in-app link to their website for users to set up or manage an account. If this ruling is upheld, however, Apple will be required to extend this allowance to all types of apps. The ruling also ensures that developers would be able to explicitly mention alternative payment options.

In August 2020, Apple removed Fortnite from the App Store after Epic Games introduced a direct payment option in the app for its in-game currency V-Bucks, in defiance of the App Store rules. In an orchestrated move, Epic Games promptly filed a lawsuit against Apple, accusing Apple of having a monopoly over the sale of apps and in-app purchases through the App Store.

Judge Rogers ruled that Epic Games shall pay damages equal to 30% of the $12,167,719 in revenue that Epic Games collected from users in the Fortnite app on iOS through direct payments between August 2020 and October 2020, plus 30% of any such revenue Epic Games collected from November 1, 2020 through the date of judgment, plus interest.

Apple is likely to appeal the decision. We’ve reached out to the company for comment and we will update this story if we hear back.

Update: Apple has issued the following statement, as shared by Nick Statt: “Today the Court ha affirmed what we’ve known all along: the App Store is not in violation of antitrust law. As the Court recognized ‘success is not illegal.’ Apple faces rigorous competition in every segment in which we do business, and we believe customers and developers choose us because our products and services are the best in the world. We remain committed to ensuring the App Store is a safe and trusted marketplace that supports a thriving developer community and more than 2.1 million U.S. jobs, and where rules apply equally to everyone.”

Abdullah Anaman

I'm a software developer specialized in frontend and backend development for complex scalable web apps and mobile apps.

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